Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing

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5.0
 
4.5 (2)
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Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing

Anthem Information

Voicing
Year Published

Ordering Information

Catalog No.
9780193860605

Come, thou fount of every blessing. (No. 4 of Four American Folk Hymns). By Mack Wilberg (1955-). For SATB choir and organ (Orchestra: 2, 2, 2, 2-4, 3, 3, 1-timpani, percussion-strings, Chamber orchestra: 3 trumpets, timpani, organ, strings, Brass: 4 horns, 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, percussion, organ). Mixed Voices. Choral, sacred. Vocal score. 16 pages. Duration 6'.

 

For SATB and organ, full or chamber orchestra or brass ensemble. This is No. 4 of Four American Folk Hymns which draw on the rich folk traditions of New England and rural Southern United States. Mack Wilberg has taken a low-key approach in his arrangements allowing the pure folk flavour to shine through. Instrumental material is available on hire from the publisher.

Editor review

1 review

Trascendent, heavenly, glorious!
(Updated: April 25, 2013)
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Choral Integrity 
 
5.0
Textual Quality 
 
5.0
Teachability 
 
5.0
Audience Response 
 
5.0
This setting of "Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing" is one of the most compelling and exciting choral/orchestral anthems I have ever conducted. What begins a cappella with a single unison line ends with guns blazing and everyone singing and playing to their full capacities. The build-up of texture, depth, breadth, width, height, as well as dynamics is nothing short of awesome - a word I use very seldom.

I'm not certain this piece can reach its full potential without the orchestra. The chorus and orchestra are woven so tightly together in this arrangement that it is almost unthinkable to consider one without the other.

Selected for the 2013 Labor Day at the Cathedral (for adult singers), this anthem fills the room with energy which seems to reverberate for days afterward. It is very exciting to think of the sound of 200 adults singing this anthem in the National Cathedral with full orchestra.

The Bottom Line

Pros
The most powerful choral setting of this hymn to date
Cons
Because of range and demand, recommended for adult singers
RE
#1 Reviewer 117 reviews
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User reviews

2 reviews

Overall rating 
 
4.5
Choral Integrity 
 
5.0  (2)
Textual Quality 
 
5.0  (2)
Teachability 
 
3.0  (2)
Audience Response 
 
5.0  (2)
Can't Beat it
Overall rating 
 
4.5
Choral Integrity 
 
5.0
Textual Quality 
 
5.0
Teachability 
 
3.0
Audience Response 
 
5.0
This setting has everything you need. You really can't beat it. It will only work well with a larger, full choir that can put out a lot of healthy sound. It is best to use the orchestration, but the organ reduction works well (if you have a good organist). The organ reduction is not easy and must be registered well.

The Bottom Line

Pros
Soaring Orchestration and Choral Parts
CK
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Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing
Overall rating 
 
4.5
Choral Integrity 
 
5.0
Textual Quality 
 
5.0
Teachability 
 
3.0
Audience Response 
 
5.0
I first heard this stunning work at Ridegcrest sung by the Sons and Daughters of Jubal. It was the first moment of choral excellence that led me to church music ministry. Wilberg's treatment of the text is unlike any other.

It's not easy, but the time required to learn it is well worth the effort. It's necessary to have strong SSAATTBB sections to adequately execute the 1st, 2nd, and 4th verses. While the organ accompaniment is sufficient, the string parts in the interludes and 4th verse are unrivaled by solo organ.

If you have a festival or joint choir concert and adequate time to prepare, this is an excellent worship service ending.

The Bottom Line

Pros
Absolutely breathtaking and unique
Cons
Not suitable for a smaller or less-experienced choir.
SA
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